ROSS BAYONET

 

 

ROSS MKI

As indicated above the difference between the MKI and the initial trials blades was the pommel retention method. The production model has the 14.2 mm muzzle ring, with a annular split retaining spring on the inside of the muzzle ring to ensure a tight fit on the MkI rifle. Design was sealed on November 11 1907

Ross MkI with extended muzzle ring containing the retaining spring. Complete with correct MkI scabbard

 

 

Slightly bent muzzle ring still contains the internal anti-rattle spring, ease of damage is very evident

 

Canadian acceptance mark on grips

 

 

August 1909 manufacture date

 

MkI scabbard with 1915 date

 

MKII

The crosspiece has a larger  ring, with no step on the muzzle ring , additionally the muzzle ring  spring  was deleted. The crosspiece was brazed onto the tang and blade, but after October 1912, this was secured by pins instead. The blades and finish are the same as the MkI

canada Ross.jpg (54756 bytes)

1910 Ross Mk11 pattern 1

 

MKII with modified blade

Not really a new model as often reported this was an attempt to improve the penetration properties of the Ross bayonet by putting a sharp angled grind to the point of the normally rounded point of the Ross , it gives a very distinctive blade profile

Canada Ross with ground point.jpg (55609 bytes)

Mk 11 with modified blade with ground point

 

MKII British Contract

There appears to be three variations to this

1) crossguard marked

2) Ricasso Marked

3) Crossguard marked

There are also blades with UK acceptance marks and Canadian ones, which I can only assume were "impounded" by the British who then supplied the Canadian troops with SMLE rifles

Ross bayonet with 1WOL grip marks. Scabbard is marked to 255th Battalion of the CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force), pommel has Canadian acceptance mark

 

Throat of scabbard has serial number

 

 

Cross guard has Enfield inspection stamp and WD arrow  

 

Canadian Ross made for UK issue, these have a hollow ground blade  rather than the straight blade found on the Canadian issue bayonets

 

UK acceptance marks on Cross guard

 

Frog has brass button to fix it onto the belt

 

UK NAVAL CONTRACT

The grips have an M marked between the top screw and the pommel with a serial number between the screws. My example is one of those later provided to Chile

Ross bayonet, provided to the Chileans . The bayonets are part of a contract for 500 for the Royal Navy as shown by the cross guard marks and the distinctive UK pattern scabbard. Scabbard markings would indicate manufacture in 1911. Blade also has a point profile not seen on any other issue Ross

 

ROSS MkIII

Modified to fit the Ross MkII3* rifle this model of the Ross has a set back muzzle ring. I have only seen these reported on the brothers web site articles on the Ross

 to come????

 

ROSS Scabbard WWII

It appears there was a WWII contract for replacement scabbards for the Ross bayonet. The Canadian stamp indicates Canadian use but no further details are available at this time

Interesting Ross scabbard made in 1941?

 

FIGHTING KNIVES

Lots of variations to these. Including commercially made ones using the Ross as a basis for a shorter fighting knife

canada ross fighting knife hilt.jpg (91251 bytes)

Modified Ross MkI. used as fighting knife

 

Removed muzzle ring and press stud

 

FOREIGN USE

i.e. not UK or Canada

US

20,000 Ross rifles and Bayonets were bought by US militia units/national guard units for training purposes, these were taken from Canadian stocks and where not newly manufactured items

US issue MkI Canadian ROSS bayonet Both scabbard and hilt are marked with US flaming bomb mark.

 

Early Canadian Pattern marks on pommel

 

Slightly distorted muzzle ring still contains original anti-rattle spring, later dropped from the type

 

 

Scabbard shows Canadian acceptance marks and 1916 makers dates

 

 

CHILE

Chile used the Ross which is identifiable by a cross guard serial D.A. xxx. These bayonets were apparently bought as part of a ship purchase from the UK with the ex UK navy ship HMS Canada and were ex British blades with the added serial

Ross bayonet, provided to the Chileans . The bayonets are part of a contract for 500 for the Royal Navy as shown by the cross guard marks and the distinctive UK pattern scabbard. Scabbard markings would indicate manufacture in 1911. Blade also has a point profile not seen on any other issue Ross

DA serial is Chile

 

Afghanistan

It appears that the Afghans used Ross rifles with modified blades and also with bayonets converted from Turkish 1890 bayonets

 

Converted Ross  bayonet
1890 bayonet converted to fit on the Ross rifle